Latest topics

Jodha Akbar 69: The skeleton behind the mirror 5 5 7

Jodha Akbar 69: The skeleton behind the mirror

Post new topic   Reply to topic

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Jodha Akbar 69: The skeleton behind the mirror

Post by sashashyam on 2013-09-21, 17:14

Folks,





I do not know about you, but for me, the abiding image after yesternight's turbulent episode, that eddied and swirled with violent emotions and violent reactions, was not that of Jalal kneeling on the floor of his chamber, throwing his head  back, and screaming in unrestrained, gut wrenching anguish: Aapne hamare saath aise kyon  kiya, Badiammi ?, even as images of a happier, more gentle past with her, and others of her braving cannon fire to rescue him from  certain death, flash across his mind.





Jalal & Rahim: Nor was it the incredibly charming scene where  Jalal, with  a  grasp of  child psychology that would have done a naanijaan proud, and is astonishing in a youg man who is  a warrior and an emperor,  and who does not even have a niece or nephew,  coaxes Rahim's tale of the dibbi out of him at long last.

 

When he tells the child, perched cosily in his lap,  Aapki Chotiammi ko aapke aapas ki baatein humein nahin bataani chaahiye thi,  I applauded vigorously, for his unerring, gentle  understanding of what was really  bothering Rahim was amazing. Then the other dibbis from Altaf Qadri's shop, as a test for Rahim's identification of the fatal one, the promise of a multitude of toys,  and the vital assurance that Rahim would not be punished in any way.





It is thus that Rahim, ensconced in  his ataliq's lap, and encouraged by his mother to tell the truth, is finally persuaded  to unburden himself.





I am, right now, not going into the impact of that truth on Jalal's psyche. I knew it would shatter him and it does. When he  says to himself, bitterly, Mere hi saaye ne mere peeth mein chura bhonk diya,  the full agony of this betrayal,  by the one he loved above all others and trusted above all others, stands fully revealed.  As we watch  Jalal  walking thru the palace corridors after leaving Salima's rooms, his face a mask of misery and his shoulders hunched as if under a sudden burden too heavy even for him to bear, the depth of  the trauma is  laid bare.





Let us rather consider what the way Jalal handles Rahim reveals about Jalal himself. He is able to look at the whole matter from the child's perspective, peep  into the child's mind, guess what is troubling him, and then find a way to calm  those fears convincingly, and all this without alarming Rahim in the least.





When contrasted with the way in which Jodha, a very kind person in general and extremely affectionate towards  Rahim, and moreover one who is used to children, bombards him with leading questions and stampedes him into angry flight, Jalal's rating goes much higher.





The comparison also proves a point I have reiterated in the past. No one can accuse Jodha of being over imaginative, for she has no imagination. She cannot put herself  in the place of another person  and try to think as he would think, and this whether is is Rahim, whom she loves, or Jalal, whom she professes to hate. 





Whereas Jalal, the quintessential alpha male, a species not generally known for its sensitivity, and moreover one who constantly advertises his heartlessness, can get effortlessly into the heart of a four year old and win the child's trust. What does this say about him?





To revert, nor was it the scene that follows, with the slow changes in Jalal's  face as Rahim proceeds with his story of how he found  the dibbi. It is as if the features are being crumpled, one layer at a time, by the hand of fate, as the depth of the betrayal sinks into his zehen.





Jalal-Salima: Nor the last exchange between Jalal and Salima, as he rises to leave, and  asks her, simply,  Salima Begum? There are different kinds of bonds, and the one between them, based on their shared love  for his Khan Baba, is such that no explanations are needed. When she assures him that his secret will go with her to the grave, Jalal attempts a smile of grateful acknowledgement that does not quite come off. The weary sadness in his face and his eyes tugs at her heart, as it does at ours, as he inclines his head wordlessly and leaves.




Mahaam Anga & Adham: No, it was none of the above high points, though each, in its own way, put us thru an emotional wringer.





It was the moment when Mahaam Anga, her mouth working and her kohl-rimmed eyes ablaze with the light of near madness, assures her frantic son that they  are going nowhere, that nothing will happen to either of them,  that she wants to see what Jalal will do, adding, Aage aage dekho hota hai kya.As Adham looks on in despair, his normally rough,  brutal face now like that of a frightened child, she rises to her feet and turns away from him.





Sharbat piyo!





My skin literally crawled at the sound of those two little words. Was this a Lady Macbeth, as Stargirl would have it, confident that evil will prevail ? Was she  a witch from centuries past, now reincarnated, and sure that the forces of darkness she has placated will see her thru this crisis ?  Or was it something else? The last weapon of an intrigante sans pareille, a mistress of intrigue,  incomparable in her deadly skill at weaving webs of deceit and betrayal?





Mahaam moves to another room, adjusts her cowl in front of a huge mirror in the light of a mashaal, then opens a secret door behind that mirror (there seems to be no special hidden latch, no key, nothing. So how this door remained a secret in the terminally nosy rabbit warren of the Agra palace is an even greater mystery than that of Mahaam's unshakeable self-confidence). She pushes open yet  another  whitish door that lies behind, turns back to us,  and intones ominously Waqt aa gayaa hai. 




End of scene.




A totally paisa vasool  scene, as they say of the movies. A cliffhanger of an ending, guaranteed to push BP levels across the forum to dangerous  heights. My blood pressure is chronically low, and then again, I am not going to  drive myself nuts in frenzied, and ultimately fruitless speculation.





Maybe, just to justify  those heavy handed references to Mullah Beqazi, a humshakal  of the Emperor Humayun, that were pushed into our faces by the CVs,  like a conjuror proferring a card during a card trick, Mahaam has an unfortunate humshakal  secreted behind that tinny looking white door. Maybe she is going to produce her that night at the gathering where Jalal, in the precap, proclaims his Badiammi to be the murderer of his unborn child , shoves her to the floor and  screams his heart out at her: Kyon kiya aapne aise? Maybe.





But why fret unnecessarily for all of  3 long days till Monday night? Let us chill, and  await developments.  While we do so, it is interesting to note that when alerted by the ever faithful Resham to the impending danger that threatens his Ammijaan's life, all that the son for whom she has betrayed her very soul can think of is that his own mustaqbil (future) will be destroyed if she is caught and punished. So much for fiial love! Poor Mahaam, though this might see m a strange thing to say of a murderess and a traitor.




Jodha: I have already noted her lack of imagination. As Jodha and  Moti give each  other high fives and  rejoice, understandably, that Shahenshah ki aankhon ki  patti khul gayi!,  I would  have been pleased if she could have added just one little sentence that marked her understanding of what this crushing blow would mean for Jalal. After what she has learnt of the  horrors of his childhood, and the  roots of his unshakeable faith in and love for his Badiammi, Iwould have expected a woman as intelligent as Jodha to have been able to grasp the depth of his grief at this betrayal.





The  contrast with Salima's face, that mirrors the gathering clouds of grief and despair  on Jalal's face as Rahim proceeds with his tale, is striking.





To forestall a torrent of legitimate complaints about the atrocious way in which Jodha  was treated by Jalal during the affair of the dature ka ark,  and why then should she feel the least bit sorry for his present plight,  let me add the following.

I do not say that Jodha should sympathise or empathise with Jalal  over this brutal shock he hea suffered.  But she should be able to understand it as an analyst would understand it. That would show her intelligence and her ability to set her personal emotions aside when analysing a situation. This is precisely the need to set aside sambandh and moh when seeking the truth, as she herself advises Jalal. The sambandh  can be good or bad, and the maxim applies to her as much as it does to Jalal. 


But Jodha  gives no inkling of any such understanding, at least as of now.


Secondly, it is not as though she does not care what happens to her vivekheen patidev. In fact, as I had noted 2 days ago in my Changing Equations post, about her sudden declaration of her being Jalal's shubchintak,  and her railing about how Mahaam did not love him as he loved her, that those close to the Shahenshah were  there only to exploit his power, the facts seem to point in the opposite direction!

 

To revert, Jodha also  seems quite incapable of understanding what Bharmal explains so clearly to his family today, that Ratan Singh, who sponsored dacoits who preyed on the common people,  was a totally undesirable husband for Sukanya. She never even thinks on those logical lines.





But there was one curious and revealing glimpse of Jodha  last night, which was pointed out  by Lashy. While exulting in her deduction that the Shahenshah had gone to the bazaar in disguise to seek sakshya  about the  case, she also wonders whether, at least now that he has heard the full truth from Rahim, he would, finally,  believe her, Jodha, or whether he would once more forgive Mahaam Anga. Her desire that he should believe in her is clearly not in accord with her professed ghrina for him. But then, this is hardly news for us, right, folks?


Jalal-Mahaam:
I had argued yesterday on Mansi's thread that contrary to those who felt that he would hesitate about punishing Mahaam, I was convinced of the contrary. Let us take the ehsaan angle first. Jalal owed even more to Bairam Khan than to Mahaam, but  when the crunch came, and he was seen as to usurp the Shahenshah's authority, Jalal was finally ready to do battle against him.


The nature of Mahaam's crime, I felt, would, if it was proved against her irrefutably, completely negate everything she  has ever done for  Jalal and more. Jalal's love for her would be curdled in that instant and  would turn into  hate.The Mahaam Anga in the  film had not done anything remotely as evil as this, and yet she was swept aside in an instant. 





I was pleased to see that for once, my take on a plot development turned out to be correct! That Mahaam might still weasel her way out of this crunch by using a doppelganger (German for lookalike) does not affect this point, that Jalal is no longer  so enmeshed  in  gratitude  for past caring that he will condone present betrayal. He is slowly changing, is Jalal, and the outlines of the future Akbar are dimly visible already.





Bharmal: I never thought I  would ever do this, but I was mentally cheering the portly  Bharmal when he was exposing his lamenting womenfolk, with gentle but compelling logic,   to a series of home truths: about the villainy of Ratan Singh,  that would have ruled him out as a husband for  Sukanya had it been known in advance, about the Shahenshah's compulsions as  a ruler dispensing justice and about the corrective actions he had taken as  soon as he  could, about the tough choice he himself had had to make between Jodha's future and Sukanya's.





It was an admirable  display of balanced judgement and calm wisdom. He did let Jalal down more lightly than the facts of the case really warranted, but then that too was necessary to preserve the peace of  mind of his household.





So, on to Monday and the skeleton, not in the closet, but behind the mirror!




Shyamala B.Cowsik


sashashyam
Glittering Gold
Glittering Gold

Posts: 778
Join date: 2013-08-01

Back to top Go down

Re: Jodha Akbar 69: The skeleton behind the mirror

Post by pollyanna on 2013-09-23, 12:15

Hi Aunty.....like u...I absolutely loved jalal-rahim interaction....kaun kehta hai jalal ke seene mein dil aur sar mein dimaag nahi hai :P bas usko sahi waqt ka intezaar rehta hai...aur dono apna kaam barabar se karte hain.... Wink

@MA: less said the better...Ashwini is such a talented actress.....I will cry when she will leave the show.....but for now...we can just enjoy the culinary flavours she dish out to us....

Loved the way u described MA-AK scene :)

pollyanna
Channel Moderator
Channel Moderator

Posts: 5659
Join date: 2013-02-02
Location: Bangalore,India

Back to top Go down

Re: Jodha Akbar 69: The skeleton behind the mirror

Post by sashashyam on 2013-09-23, 12:33

pollyanna wrote:Yes, Pallavi, his real problem is not that he is heartless, but that he has too much of heart at times,whether it is Mahaam or Rahim or that little Hindu boy in the Diwan-e-Aam. He is emotional to excess when his zehen is touched to the quick, as when his Khan Baba is no more and now, facing a huge betrayal.

Shyamala AuntyHi Aunty.....like u...I absolutely loved jalal-rahim interaction....kaun kehta hai jalal ke seene mein dil aur sar mein dimaag nahi hai :P bas usko sahi waqt ka intezaar rehta hai...aur dono apna kaam barabar se karte hain.... Wink

@MA: less said the better...Ashwini is such a talented actress.....I will cry when she will leave the show.....but for now...we can just enjoy the culinary flavours she dish out to us....

Loved the way u described MA-AK scene :)

sashashyam
Glittering Gold
Glittering Gold

Posts: 778
Join date: 2013-08-01

Back to top Go down

Re: Jodha Akbar 69: The skeleton behind the mirror

Post by monsi08 on 2013-09-23, 13:32

loved Bharmal and his 2nd daughters' actions.. but I still dont know why the same cannot be understood by Jodha even though she knew it from many different resources !

monsi08
Glittering Gold
Glittering Gold

Posts: 867
Join date: 2013-02-15
Age: 35
Location: Bangalore

Back to top Go down

Re: Jodha Akbar 69: The skeleton behind the mirror

Post by Abavi on 2013-09-23, 16:31

Loved your take Shyamala ji... You say Jalal will go ahead and punish MA... I ask, if he wanted this secret to go out, why did he ask Salima begum to keep it a secret?


Abavi
Dazzling Diamond

Posts: 3977
Join date: 2013-02-06
Location: India

Back to top Go down

Re: Jodha Akbar 69: The skeleton behind the mirror

Post by sashashyam on 2013-09-23, 17:15

I think that was his initial reaction, but he changes his mind.Shyamala B.CowsikAbavi wrote:Loved your take Shyamala ji... You say Jalal will go ahead and punish MA... I ask, if he wanted this secret to go out, why did he ask Salima begum to keep it a secret?


sashashyam
Glittering Gold
Glittering Gold

Posts: 778
Join date: 2013-08-01

Back to top Go down

Re: Jodha Akbar 69: The skeleton behind the mirror

Post by --sumana13-- on 2013-09-24, 05:40

Absolutely awesome post Shyamala .. Loved the way you have analysed each character here .. And you so correctly predicted about the hum shakal being made the scapegoat ...

--sumana13--
Master Writer
Master Writer

Posts: 25520
Join date: 2013-02-04

Back to top Go down

Re: Jodha Akbar 69: The skeleton behind the mirror

Post by sashashyam on 2013-09-24, 08:46

Thank you,my dear. and I adore your green roses!!Shyamala--sumana13-- wrote:Absolutely awesome post Shyamala .. Loved the way you have analysed each character here .. And you so correctly predicted about the hum shakal being made the scapegoat ...

sashashyam
Glittering Gold
Glittering Gold

Posts: 778
Join date: 2013-08-01

Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


Post new topic   Reply to topic
Permissions in this forum:
You can reply to topics in this forum