Latest topics

Jodha Akbar 80: The wages of folly

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Jodha Akbar 80: The wages of folly

Post by sashashyam on 2013-10-08, 10:00

Folks,
I was bemused, as I scanned thru the forum just now, to see nothing except lamentations and complaints  that there was no jungle romance. No wonder the CVs, subjected to these barrages,  periodically slip into a Mills and Boon track, regardless of what it is that sets Jodha Akbar, even though it is an Ekta production, apart from the mushy  soaps that foam all around us on TV these days!
So, despite the fact that there was  nothing much today to analyse, I thought of sharing  my very different take on this episode with those who might be interested
First, even  in  such few posts as do not fit into the above-mentioned deep mourning category, , the  focus is on giving Jodha credit for her  honesty in confessing that it was all  the wages of her folly.
I think the precap is a nightmare of hers, for a  different reason, but let that pass for the moment. What else could  or would Jodha have done? She cannot tell a direct lie to her Ammijaan. Racked as she is by remorse and shame, it is  in fact a kind of catharsis  for her to confess and invite punishment. She simply has no other way out. It is not honesty, it is an attempt to lessen the guilt that weighs her down like a rock.
If she had had a greater understanding of the repercussions of such self-indulgent candour, she would at least have tried to fudge matters even if  she could not lie. But she has no such understanding, and so she blurts  out  everything.

I always felt,  and wrote somewhere here yesterday, that Jalal's first concern would be to keep her, given her acute sense of guilt and shame, from  revealing  the  truth. To keep her not only from putting herself beyond the pale, but  also  from  bringing shame on the Mughal sultanate, the very thing he had worked so hard to prevent after her suicide attempt. But  Jalal is too far gone to do anything of the kind.

The heart of the matter: For me, the core of the beautifully conceptualised and presented episode lay elsewhere than  in the shots of a distraught Jodha with nothing to do except shed tears of guilt.

Firstly, it was all  handled much better than I had expected. It was far grimmer, and the desperation and the trauma got to me.  I am far more cynical than most of you, and I am not easily moved by manufactured tragedy. But I could actually feel it, and I did not look at the scenes of Jodha,  struggling to salvage something from the wreckage her sanctimonious folly had  created,  as  if I was judging an acting competition, in a detached and critical manner.

Even as I wanted to clout her, I could feel her helpless agony as she cradled her bleeding and unconscious husband  in her arms and tried to  shake him back to consciousness. This is as much to the credit of the scripting as  to that of Paridhi, whose wild eyed incoherence, morphing into renewed determination as she straps Jalal to herself and tries  to get him to safety, was as real as anything I have seen on the big screen.

Jalal in extremis: But in the final analysis, that segment belonged to  Rajat's Jalal. He believes he is dying, but there was nothing maudlin about him, no fake heroism. Those who have recovered after a near death experience  say that at the instant of death, all of one's past life, and all of one's unfulfilled wishes, the adhoore sapne,  flash before one's eyes.  So too it is with Jalal. All he can think of  before he passes out is  to spare his Ammijaan and Ruqaiya the bloody sight, and all he regrets is that he could no fulfil Ruqaiya's desire for a child, and  the manner of his dying, on a jungle floor mauled by a tiger, not on the battlefield as  a soldier.

Rajat's take on a Jalal who believes he is dying was superlative. When he graduates to films, as he is bound to,  he will be magisterial  in the death scenes. When he smiles even then  at Jodha,  and asks her how she can be sure he will survive, the calm acceptance in that smile touches one as  no deathbed speech would have done. As he struggles to tell  her something - his Jodha Begum, Jodha Begum .. ending in a fruitless struggle with his fading senses before he is able to convey anything, one hangs on his words, one gasps with every pain-wracked breath he draws.

Jodha -an innocent abroad:  Secondly,   Jodha  proves  the truth of what I had written about her yesterday, that she has no understanding of anything beyond her Amer, like a frog in a well. She is like a small town girl pitchforked into the capital of an empire, with none of the understanding of the complexities of imperial governance that the gentle and equally goodhearted Salima has.
The Mughal ladies are able to look beyond their personal grief; they know what is really at stake   as this one young man hovers between life and death. 
Hamida Banu, facing the greatest tragedy that can ever befall  a  mother, the prospect of the death of a child - and the lines from Sholay  come to one's mind :  Jaante ho duniya ka sabse bada bhoj kya hai? Baap ke kandhe par bete ka janaza - can still rise above her personal agony and fear for the fate of the empire and its subjects if Jalal dies without an heir, and chaos ensues in a no holds barred struggle for succession .
Mahaam Anga, though shellshocked,  can still think of the paramount need - now that there is no Bairam Khan to hold the fort till Jalal recovers - for her  to step  into the breach and keep the wheels of  government turning, so that the enemies of the Mughal sultanate do not think of attempting a coup. She might, in some recess of her being, be also  thinking  of  what Jalal's passing might mean for her son, but right now  she is hardwired to handle any crisis,  with her sole  focus on preserving and protecting the  interests of the Mughal sultanate.
In this context, it is of great political importance that the truth about Jodha's folly does not become common knowledge, whether inside the harem or, worse, out  in the bazaar, the subject of common gossip and popular derision.

If it  were to get out into the streets, the scandal would shake the Sultanate. It is not a question of Jodha, but of the prestige of the Shahenshah, and of the repercussions  for his reputation even if he were to survive, as the man in the street would believe his Rajput wife tried to kill him.  But Jodha, in an agony of self-reproach, has no comprehension of the gravity of any of this.

Which is why I feel the precap is another of Jodha's nightmares. If Ruqaiya  learns the truth from Jodha, how can the scandal be contained? Every harem inmate, alerted by her wailing,  will become  a bush telegraph, and the facts, and the even more lurid  rumours that will surface in their wake, will spread across the empire  at the speed, not of sound, but of light. I do not think the CVs will show such a monumental scandal engulfing Agra, for it could never have been whitewashed post facto.
Well, we know that Jalal will survive. We know that this incident will bring him and Jodha closer.  But for now, Jodha, with no access to Jalal's sick  chamber, will be reduced, when she pauses from justified self-flagellation,  to haranguing the long suffering Kanha.  He must already be hunting for the ear plugs he had misplaced while Jodha was safely away on the way to Ajmer.
Star of the day: Hamida Banu. Even in the depth of shock and grief, and even after learning that it was all Jodha's doing, she can find it in herself to maintain her dignity and to react with restraint.  Not to slap Jodha or scream abuse at her, but merely ask her to pray that Jalal survives, as other wise the fallout for the empire would be beyond her imagination. This is what is meant by grace under pressure. Jodha badly needs a lesson in this, and she can do no better than learn from her Ammijaan.
Shyamala B.Cowsik

sashashyam
Glittering Gold
Glittering Gold

Posts : 855
Join date : 2013-08-01

Back to top Go down

Re: Jodha Akbar 80: The wages of folly

Post by sonshine487 on 2013-10-08, 11:00

Loved it as always, Shyamala Ji!
I too liked the near death scene!
And yes, Jalal was superlative! Loved how he had no recriminations towards the bane of his existence... Jodha Begum! But he seemed to crave her company... he was disturbed when she moves from his side.

Also Jodha's careless irreverence towards all things "siyasati"! Her preoccupation with her so called Principles! LOL! her notions of Paap are really too cut and dried. Nirdosh Pashu! ROFL!

But what if we look at it from another angle! How old was Jodha when she married? Some records say she was in her mid-teens. How can we expect a girl like that to be grown-up just because she is married and an empress?

sonshine487
Dazzling Diamond

Posts : 1510
Join date : 2013-02-04

Back to top Go down

Re: Jodha Akbar 80: The wages of folly

Post by ShaliniRobinson on 2013-10-08, 11:19

Thumbsup  I dunno why they don't have an emoticon for applause... but consider yourself applauded :)

Once again, I love the write up. It is thankfully a practical view of the situation. Just last night I was amused during a convo in the written update -- in a situation so grave, all that fandom can worry about is the hit on romance and the probable chances for losing the romance angle.

Thank you so much for retaining the 'grace under pressure' :)

I do agree with you so much. After the episode, I was telling my Ma - 'thank goodness, they didn't show Jalal coming out of the Tiger attack with just a few scratches.' Such stuff is good only in Himmatwala. Even in fiction, a good hold on realism is needed to being about believability.

Jodha needs many lessons before she can justify the title of the queen. I wonder how she didn't catch these lessons from her own mother who showed excellent sense in Jalal's court. For one who is ready with a speech on what should or should not be, it is curious that she doesn't seem to apply a lot of what she preaches.

She is like this bookish chemistry scholar who's never been in a lab and hence - the explosion after explosion.

Hamida asks - Why is it always Jodha who lands in trouble?
Well, Queen Mum, she chooses to step into it willingly!

Jodha does anything solely for the purpose of what she thinks, she wants, or she feels. She barely stops to consider the consequences of her actions. Even her mannat for teaching Jalal a lesson is an immature and childish desire.

Your comparison of Jodha to a frog in the well is apt. She doesn't see beyond anything she doesn't want to see beyond. Too bad, her well is her own stubborn ego. The dame didn't hold back a speech even when Jalal was gravely injured and she was washing the wounds near the river - and then, told him to shut up to conserve energy. Perhaps, Jalal's reason to shut up was to avoid another round of hollow speeches.


--

In her favor - Jodha usually has good intentions, executed incorrectly. She has a good aim, but the manner in which she brings it about speaks volumes about her immaturity and inexperience, plus ego.

Jalal is beginning to see this about her, it seems.

..

Poor Jalal. All he wanted was a little fun and maybe an attempt to let things between him and Jodha cool down.

He's getting his wish - just in the most dangerous way possible!

..

By the way, LOVE the tidbit about kanha looking for misplaced earplugs. I guess, Jalal might've borrowed them.

ShaliniRobinson
Shining Silver
Shining Silver

Posts : 599
Join date : 2013-03-05

Back to top Go down

Re: Jodha Akbar 80: The wages of folly

Post by sashashyam on 2013-10-08, 11:42

No, she was not in her mid-teens, she was 22 days older than Jalal, who was  19 going on 20. Plus, you have to remember that  a mid-teens princess in the 16th century was not even remotely like  one such today. She would have been prepared for the jauhar if called upon to do it, and she would have been drilled in implicit obedience to her royal husband and her inlaws.I am sure the real Princess of Amer who married Jalal in 1562 was like that, and not like this strange anachronistic version. But this is, unfortunately,  needed for TV TRPs. The film version was much more plausible.Shyamalasonshine487 wrote:Loved it as always, Shyamala Ji!
I too liked the near death scene!
And yes, Jalal was superlative! Loved how he had no recriminations towards the bane of his existence... Jodha Begum! But he seemed to crave her company... he was disturbed when she moves from his side.

Also Jodha's careless irreverence towards all things "siyasati"! Her preoccupation with her so called Principles! LOL! her notions of Paap are really too cut and dried. Nirdosh Pashu! ROFL!

But what if we look at it from another angle! How old was Jodha when she married? Some records say she was in her mid-teens. How can we expect a girl like that to be grown-up just because she is married and an empress?

sashashyam
Glittering Gold
Glittering Gold

Posts : 855
Join date : 2013-08-01

Back to top Go down

Re: Jodha Akbar 80: The wages of folly

Post by sashashyam on 2013-10-08, 11:51

Shalini, thank you for the applause (they have an emoticon for it elsewhere, a little round face and a  pair of hands clapping), and then for the very interesting and comprehensive response. And your dry wit, which matches mine, I  loved the bit about the earplugs having been appropriated by Jalal! Yes, and the part about the bookish chemistry student who had never been in a lab.Good intentions are not a sufficient excuse for nearly having someone killed. That is why there is  a stiff jail sentence for manslaughter.I am NOT  a romantic, and rather cynical, come to think of it, and so I am perennially astonished that I get so many viewings and so many likes for my IF posts. But very few on those often very sweet and appreciative responses is  are really in sync with the way I think and feel, which is why your take pleases me so much. Thank you once again.ShyamalaShaliniRobinson wrote:Thumbsup  I dunno why they don't have an emoticon for applause... but consider yourself applauded :)

Once again, I love the write up. It is thankfully a practical view of the situation. Just last night I was amused during a convo in the written update -- in a situation so grave, all that fandom can worry about is the hit on romance and the probable chances for losing the romance angle.

Thank you so much for retaining the 'grace under pressure' :)

I do agree with you so much. After the episode, I was telling my Ma - 'thank goodness, they didn't show Jalal coming out of the Tiger attack with just a few scratches.' Such stuff is good only in Himmatwala. Even in fiction, a good hold on realism is needed to being about believability.

Jodha needs many lessons before she can justify the title of the queen. I wonder how she didn't catch these lessons from her own mother who showed excellent sense in Jalal's court. For one who is ready with a speech on what should or should not be, it is curious that she doesn't seem to apply a lot of what she preaches.

She is like this bookish chemistry scholar who's never been in a lab and hence - the explosion after explosion.

Hamida asks - Why is it always Jodha who lands in trouble?
Well, Queen Mum, she chooses to step into it willingly!

Jodha does anything solely for the purpose of what she thinks, she wants, or she feels. She barely stops to consider the consequences of her actions. Even her mannat for teaching Jalal a lesson is an immature and childish desire.

Your comparison of Jodha to a frog in the well is apt. She doesn't see beyond anything she doesn't want to see beyond. Too bad, her well is her own stubborn ego. The dame didn't hold back a speech even when Jalal was gravely injured and she was washing the wounds near the river - and then, told him to shut up to conserve energy. Perhaps, Jalal's reason to shut up was to avoid another round of hollow speeches.--

In her favor - Jodha usually has good intentions, executed incorrectly. She has a good aim, but the manner in which she brings it about speaks volumes about her immaturity and inexperience, plus ego.

Jalal is beginning to see this about her, it seems...

Poor Jalal. All he wanted was a little fun and maybe an attempt to let things between him and Jodha cool down. He's getting his wish - just in the most dangerous way possible!..

By the way, LOVE the tidbit about kanha looking for misplaced earplugs. I guess, Jalal might've borrowed them.

sashashyam
Glittering Gold
Glittering Gold

Posts : 855
Join date : 2013-08-01

Back to top Go down

Re: Jodha Akbar 80: The wages of folly

Post by pollyanna on 2013-10-08, 12:53

Aunty, first and foremost, u have no idea what it feels when u switch on the cell and  a PM from u pops out  early in the morning, i was so excited to read u but as luck wud have it, got stuck with office chores. Btw, did u write the post in the middle of night??? Rolling Eyes  Really??  yay.....yday epi must have meant a huge thing....bounce 

I loved the post, and yes, though Jodha has committed a blunder but when she owned up her folly....i was like , give me a hug dear.....Am sure she will clear the mess....

As for Jalal, i adore how u describe him, my heart went out to him...and his dialogues....and the scenes were just exemplary...both Rajat and Paridhi did a fabulous job.

Jodha just has to spend a little more time with Hameeda...she really behaved like a Mallika yday.

Once again, thanku so much for such a wonderful read Aunty.....

pollyanna
Channel Moderator
Channel Moderator

Posts : 5890
Join date : 2013-02-02
Location : Bangalore,India

Back to top Go down

Re: Jodha Akbar 80: The wages of folly

Post by sonshine487 on 2013-10-08, 13:03

sashashyam wrote:
No, she was not in her mid-teens, she was 22 days older than Jalal, who was  19 going on 20. Plus, you have to remember that  a mid-teens princess in the 16th century was not even remotely like  one such today. She would have been prepared for the jauhar if called upon to do it, and she would have been drilled in implicit obedience to her royal husband and her inlaws.I am sure the real Princess of Amer who married Jalal in 1562 was like that, and not like this strange anachronistic version. But this is, unfortunately,  needed for TV TRPs. The film version was much more plausible.Shyamalasonshine487 wrote:Loved it as always, Shyamala Ji!
I too liked the near death scene!
And yes, Jalal was superlative! Loved how he had no recriminations towards the bane of his existence... Jodha Begum! But he seemed to crave her company... he was disturbed when she moves from his side.

Also Jodha's careless irreverence towards all things "siyasati"! Her preoccupation with her so called Principles! LOL! her notions of Paap are really too cut and dried. Nirdosh Pashu! ROFL!

But what if we look at it from another angle! How old was Jodha when she married? Some records say she was in her mid-teens. How can we expect a girl like that to be grown-up just because she is married and an empress?
of course u r right... princesses those days were conditioned to act appropriately
but here again, the operational words are "conditioned"
what of their natural instincts?
perhaps Ekta has modeled her Jodha on modern day 19-20 yr olds

sonshine487
Dazzling Diamond

Posts : 1510
Join date : 2013-02-04

Back to top Go down

Re: Jodha Akbar 80: The wages of folly

Post by clarissasham on 2013-10-08, 15:49

such a superb writing aunty and esp loved these lines

 But in the final analysis, that segment belonged to  Rajat's Jalal. He believes he is dying, but there was nothing maudlin about him, no fake heroism. Those who have recovered after a near death experience  say that at the instant of death, all of one's past life, and all of one's unfulfilled wishes, the adhoore sapne,  flash before one's eyes.  So too it is with Jalal






jalal reflected all those emotions of a dying man 




i would like to agree this too


 she has no understanding of anything beyond her Amer, like a frog in a well 





but what ruks did in precap is unacceptable for me. . If Ruqaiya  learns the truth from Jodha, how can the scandal be contained? Every harem inmate, alerted by her wailing,  will become  a bush telegraph..i hope what u have written is true and preacp is just a prank to scare us....




loved hamida bano and her love for jodha even at this state .she is lone one who truly understands jodha 


waiting for more writing from u 


shami long hug long hug 

clarissasham
Dazzling Diamond

Posts : 2226
Join date : 2013-02-09
Age : 34
Location : india

Back to top Go down

Re: Jodha Akbar 80: The wages of folly

Post by sashashyam on 2013-10-08, 16:08

Dear Clarissa, Thanks so much for such warm praise!But Ruqaiya's slap unacceptable?? What would you  have done if your husband was now hovering between life and death because of the wanton folly of a self-righteous, opinionated idiot of a girl? Not everyone can be a Hamida Banu. I, in Ruqaiya's place, not being royal myself, would have beaten Jodha black and blue.It is not enough that she did not mean it. They have stiff sentences for manslaughter, when the killing was an accident, do they not?Shyamala Auntyclarissasham wrote:such a superb writing aunty and esp loved these lines

 But in the final analysis, that segment belonged to  Rajat's Jalal. He believes he is dying, but there was nothing maudlin about him, no fake heroism. Those who have recovered after a near death experience  say that at the instant of death, all of one's past life, and all of one's unfulfilled wishes, the adhoore sapne,  flash before one's eyes.  So too it is with Jalal
jalal reflected all those emotions of a dying man
i would like to agree this too

 she has no understanding of anything beyond her Amer, like a frog in a well 

but what ruks did in precap is unacceptable for me. . If Ruqaiya  learns the truth from Jodha, how can the scandal be contained? Every harem inmate, alerted by her wailing,  will become  a bush telegraph..i hope what u have written is true and preacp is just a prank to scare us....




loved hamida bano and her love for jodha even at this state .she is lone one who truly understands jodha 


waiting for more writing from u 


shami long hug long hug 

sashashyam
Glittering Gold
Glittering Gold

Posts : 855
Join date : 2013-08-01

Back to top Go down

Re: Jodha Akbar 80: The wages of folly

Post by Sponsored content Today at 13:24


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum