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From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

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From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by sashashyam on 2014-06-22, 17:16

Folks,

This time, I wanted to share with you, my Dhwani friends, a beautiful piece, From Jallad to Akbar,  that my young friend Sandhya had posted in the IF. To which, as you might expect, I wrote a response as long,  if not longer, than her piece hpee . But as she invited me to inflict this on her, she can hardly complain now!

I am now inflicting both our analyses on you, in the hope that you will not just survive them but even enjoy them! I am sure young Sandhya will not mind the liberty I have taken with her work.


The CVs might have badly shortchanged the momentous occasion when Jalal was bestowed with the title Akbar, and that too by his awaam,  but that is all the more reason for us to fill the gap, and Sandhya has done  a remarkable job in this respect.


I would only request her to insert the two very  striking pictures, of Jalal then and now, that she had used to illustrate her analysis. They are absolutely necessary, but I do not know how to insert them, being technologically challenged. So please do it for me, Sandhya my pet, there  is my good girl!

Shyamala/Aunty

My dearest Sandhya,



What can one say when faced with such an obvious labour of love?


It is a very comprehensive and affectionate round up of all that we have been shown of the journey from the early Jalal to the present Akbar- of course confined  to the serial script-  and as I feel about the same as you do all thru, there is nothing I need say except Bravo!

I cannot think of a single significant facet of his character development that you have missed out on, barring the much less impressive one of his personal relations.  And you have linked all the threads so smoothly and convincingly that the real Akbar himself would have been pleased!

One additional point, and this adds to Jalaluddin Muhammed Akbar's  greatness. He came of a race of fierce warriors who gave no quarter and expected none, and in whom the quality of mercy was notable by its absence.



Which was,  truth to tell common in various degrees to all great conquerors down the ages - Alexander of Macedon routinely massacred the inhabitants of all the cities that he was forced to besiege and conquer, and during the Spanish War against Napoleon (to be precise against his brother Joseph, the hapless and incapable King of Spain), the Duke of Wellington  let his troops loose on all the conquered cities, as he was perennially short of cash and had nothing with which to reward them and make them ready and willing to fight  the battles that h knew lay ahead. What happened to the population of those cities can be imagined.


The gentle and ineffectual Humayun was probably the sole exception to this rule in the nasl-e-Timuri. The forefathers of whom the present imperial family, including the oh so gentle  Hamida Banu,  is so proud, Timurlang and Chengiz Khan, would have been totally contemptuous of his  weakness, just as Bairam Khan was. They would have been right too, for see what happened to Humayun (no wonder his eyes were ever trained on Jannat, not on the here and now!) and what would have happened to Jalal but for the ruthless Bairam Khan and Mahaam Anga!


It was this ruthlessness, besides the mandatory skill in warfare, that Jalal was trained in, and expected to live up to all his life. And he did oblige his mentors, Bairam Khan and Mahaam Anga,  in his early youth, whence the sobriquet of Jalal the Jallad.


But  somewhere inside him, there must always have been the  seeds of justice, of caring, or responsibility towards his awaam, above all towards the helpless and the weak, which surely did not come from the Timuri khoon  that Hamida mentions every now and then.Maybe it was Humayun's genes, or Hamida's, but mingled with a forcefulness, and a will to dominate that was  alien to both of them, plus the killer instinct that  is needed to make a great warrior. And without  the latter qualities, there would have been no Jalal and no Akbar.


Whatever its source, it is this fierce sense of justice and this protectiveness towards those who depend on him that make Jalal ride for 17 straight days to stop Adham Khan's carnage in Malwa, and nearly kill him in the process. And made Akbar ride I do not know how many straight days to stop the sati of the Maharani of Jodhpur (I do hope they show that in the serial!).


It was the same with the sarva dharma samabhava. Jalal always believed in it deep down, perhaps influenced by his early years spent among the Rajputs, not only in Umarkot, but later in Madhya Pradesh, and when the time came, it emerged, that is all.

The greatness of Jalaluddin Muhammad Akbar  was that he did not merely tolerate  the practice of religions other than his own. He accepted it and facilitated it.


You have underlined the contrast with 16th century Europe and England, of Protestants and Catholics killing each other  in the name of religion. But it was far worse that what your lines convey. It was systematic, institutionalized killings by the State, mostly by burning at the stake -  what was called an auto da fe in the home of the Spanish Inquisition -  and this after prolonged torture on the rack and/or the wheel, to "save the  soul" of the unfortunate. Often in public, as a general celebration of the victory of "the true faith".


Nor was this kind of bigoted horror confined to medieval Europe. In the greatest country on earth, as the USA is called, till the 1930s. there were public lynchings, in the deep South,  of black Americans  accused of petty crimes. They were strung up in  public and tortured to death, while large crowds of respectable citizens watched, as if at an entertainment,therir children, in their Sunday best, on their shoulders. Picture postcards of such events were banned by the US Post only in 1923. I saw a ghastly exhibition about all this in the New York Metropolitan Museum in the mid-1990s.

Think of all this, and then think of Akbar! If Jodha had had even a very limited notion of the kinds of things that went on in Europe in her times, she would have realized that Jalal the Jallad was an angel by comparison.

Of course Akbar went even further and tried to meld the best from Hinduism and Islam into the Din-e-Ilahi, but he was far ahead of not only his time, but even our present one.


The other point I have made repeatedly, right from my 3rd or 4th post in the IF, is about Jalal's  very unusual sense of gratitude to anyone who did anything for him, from his Khan Baba and his Badiammi at one extreme to the forester who shares his food with him while he is searching for Jodha  at the other. Gratitude is rare among royalty, who have a highly pronounced sense of entitlement, and think that it is the privilege of their subjects to be able to serve them and make sacrifices for them. Jalal is the antithesis of this kind of royalty.


A companion, and not so welcome  trait is his tendency to (a) blindly trust those he sees as very close to him and (b) forgive them even the worst of trespasses for family reasons. These are dangerous traits in a great ruler, and but for the fact that  he was throughout under the protection of Adiana's Ms.Kayanat - Jaako raakhe saiyaan, maar sake na koyi  - Jalal would have been disposed of very easily by any number of insider enemies.  That he survived as the Shahenshah-e-Hind for 49 years (1556-1605) was no thanks to Jalal himself!


I am not going into the kind of poodle he has become in love. I am by now past lamenting over  such a steep fall. But  I would any day have the swaggering, rakish buccaneer who entered the enemy's domain in Amer and came out safe, beating almost impossible odds -it was wonderful to see the old Jalal in chain mail! -  instead of the lovelorn husband who practically begs his Jodha Begum to spend the night with him, and laughs helplessly when she turns him down flat. His present avatar often  makes me feel downright queasy.  


Once again, I loved your tour d'horizon of Jalal,  and your lavish tribute to Rajat for having made this Jalal his own,  so much so that one does not even think of Rajat the actor as one watches him onscreen, which is the ultimate tribute for any artist. But then need I say any of this?

Shyamala Aunty


Originally posted by Sandhya.A

JOURNEY FROM JALLAD TO AKBAR  


A year ago, we were introduced to the character of Jalalluddin Mohammad, a protege of Bairam Khan, intent on conquering and ruling the whole of Hindustan, looked upon by the people of the nation as an outsider, an invader, as a Jallad, whose name meant a heartless killer to them, hated and cursed by them all.

A year later, (a year and a few months later by serial time) we had an old man from the same people, tottering to him and expressing his wish to call him Akbar, meaning The Great and touched his feet in reverence and looked upon him as one among them, respected and loved by them all.

What a transformation from one extreme to another!

There are two things that have to work in your favour for you to achieve anything,

-Destiny and God's blessings

-Your own hard work and willingness to improve and achieve.

Jalalluddin had both.


The little fatherless boy of 13, trained, moulded and crowned by his father and king's faithful Khan Baba was exposed to little else, than battle field, blood, treachery, the superiority of power and the power of might. He was still angry with his mother who failed him in his childhood. His only solace lay in his Badiammi, who unfortunately used him to attain power and his childhood friend, who was not perceptive enough  to care for his emotions. As a result he shut his emotional side and was happy to be what he believed a 'sangdil sipahi'.

His destiny took a turn in his visit to Amer, as he looked at the desert kingdom, (an attachment he had as he was born in one of these kingdoms), and was pulled towards it though his friend thought it was a dozak.  A second turn, when he saw the 'registaan ki gulaab', a princess whose beauty swept him off. Her placing the sword at his neck  combined with his pull to her beauty filled him with the urge to possess her.  Marry her, he did...against her wishes though. But could not possess her the way he wanted to.  She was a challenge, not wanting anything from him and not willing to give him anything either, a novelty and Jalalluddin liked challenges.

In his journey to attain her, he was exposed to a whole new range of emotions. Having wrongly accused her of murder of his unborn child and having pricked her badly in the affair he felt guilt for the first time. In his journey to Ajmer, he saw her pray his way. Having been born and having spent his early years in the kingdom of Umarkot, he was open to other religions too. The fun he had in taunting her and in her sharp responses, he felt was more than the fun at winning a 100 wars. The many experiences they shared together, tested by the plots of the evil people around them, that finally culminated in her lying on the deathbed for him, made him admit to himself and God that he was in love, a feeling that he refused to admit that he could possess.

Alongside, his stability at Agra over the past year brought him closer to his own mother. The betrayal by his sister and brother in law made him feel pain of the acutest kind. The betrayal by his mother-like figure in whom he trusted more than he trusted in himself shattered him and agonised him. The falsety of his father-in-law against the total honesty of his wife, the magnanimity of his half-brother against his anger, the cheating of his childhood friend where it pricked him most, and the patience advocated by his wife to save his friendship were experiences that chiselled the fine personality in him. Nothing teaches like experience and he was a willing student.

In this year he got closer to his populace. He wanted to rule the people, not just the lands. Though he always considered his awaam as his janasheen, his birthday gift of their blessings stirred an unfelt sensation in him and in his desperate attempts to save his wife from death bed he sought  their prayers. When she was saved, he got closer to his people. He understood that a king with his powers alone cannot achieve everything. There are things like prayers and God's blessings that are more superior to his sword and that he cannot be the sole writer of his destiny .  Though he was never cruel and heartless, except perhaps on the battlefield like any other warrior, this year saw him turn very compassionate to his people.  His bottled up goodness burst out and propelled him to challenging laws and making reforms.

The plight of an unwilling young girl being forced into marriage, made him pass laws to abolish child-marriages - he went to the extent of risking his own marriage to establish this law! He spoke for widow remarriage and risked the stone pelting of an angry mob to protect a widow.  A tour into the plights of slaves made him abolish slavery. These are steps that even established and experienced kings of the land then, did not attempt to, either they did not care or they did not want to risk revolts.

In an era when Catholics and Protestents were killing each other in the west, even the divides among Hinduism did not find harmony,  with Shaivites and Vaishnavites  quarrelling, and Raam Bhakts and Krishna Bhakts refusing to see unity, here was a man from another land another religion, another faith, who saw the religion of Hindustan at equal levels as his own, bowed before the Hindu idol and accepted it as its own, inviting the wrath of the maulvis, fought them, prayed to Krishna as he saw his God and that of his wife to be no different, saw injustice in the Hindus being asked to pay tax to pray and wished to be whipped for it, abolished the tax and issued coins featuring images of both the faiths stressing the equality of all religions.

It was this final act of his that made his subjects accept him whole heartedly as their king whom they acknowledged to be Great, who loved them beyond all differences and worked for their welfare, a great king who cared for his subjects , their AKBAR, a name given by them in love, respect and admiration by which the world knew Jalal better, then and even now 5 centuries later.  

PS: Kudos to Rajat for his excellent portrayal of Jalalluddin Mohammad Akbar - as a capable shaatir sipahi with a low boiling point to a great king and a very fine human being with unbelievable levels of understanding, tolerance, affection and compassion for all. The actor has excelled in portraying all the shades of this gallant achiever. Can't imagine anyone else who could do so much justice to the character with so much conviction, grace,  sincerity and flair.

sashashyam
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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by aashyagh on 2014-06-22, 19:10

Brilliant!  I am a fan of your writing.  It's never happened that, the actor I never liked has become my most fav actor onscreen, but this guy made me stick to this for a year and haven't missed a single episode, I always make it a point to watch it and never happened with any other show for so long.  I will come back with my reply later about Jalal/ Akbar as I m unwell and unable to type longer.

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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by sandhya on 2014-06-22, 19:27

Jo Hukum Mallika-e-Jalal.fan.club............

Journey from  to


Rajat is now the face of Akbar for us all



And this aunty was my response to your response at IF

Originally posted by sashashyam

My dearest Sandhya,

What can one say when faced with such an obvious labour of love?
Love indeed it is aunty. Certain personalities from history and certain characters from mythology, epics and fiction are so loveable that they seem real and nearby .

It is a very comprehensive and affectionate round up of all that we have been shown of the journey from the early Jalal to the present Akbar- of course confined  to the serial script-  and as I feel about the same as you do all thru, there is nothing I need say except Bravo!

I cannot think of a single significant facet of his character development that you have missed out on, barring the much less impressive one of his personal relations.  And you have linked all the threads so smoothly and convincingly that the real Akbar himself would have been pleased!


One additional point, and this adds to Jalaluddin Muhammed Akbar's  greatness. He came of a race of fierce warriors who gave no quarter and expected none, and in whom the quality of mercy was notable by its absence.
Exactly, and this is what makes him exceptional. If he was a descendent of Manu Needhi Cholan and Pari Vallal and been compassionate and kind, you can understand. But with the blood of fierce warriors, if he has chosen to be just and kind, it speaks volumes of his greatness. Like Dumbledore said, it is the choices that matter- that makes a person. Though there were Slytherin traits in Harry he chose to be in Griffindor and the sorting hat put him right there. 

Which was,  truth to tell common in various degrees to all great conquerors down the ages - Alexander of Macedon routinely massacred the inhabitants of all the cities that he was forced to besiege and conquer, and during the Spanish War against Napoleon (to be precise against his brother Joseph, the hapless and incapable King of Spain), the Duke of Wellington  let his troops loose on all the conquered cities, as he was perennially short of cash and had nothing with which to reward them and make them ready and willing to fight  the battles that h knew lay ahead. What happened to the population of those cities can be imagined.

The gentle and ineffectual Humayun was probably the sole exception to this rule in the nasl-e-Timuri. The forefathers of whom the present imperial family, including the oh so gentle  Hamida Banu,  is so proud, Timurlang and Chengiz Khan, would have been totally contemptuous of his  weakness, just as Bairam Khan was. They would have been right too, for see what happened to Humayun (no wonder his eyes were ever trained on Jannat, not on the here and now!) and what would have happened to Jalal but for the ruthless Bairam Khan and Mahaam Anga!
I must admit, I expected a word of thanks to MA too, along with BK, in his 10th year celebrations of the Battle of Panipet as she too had a big role in making him a shahenshah. He could have acknowledged her services in public and yet kept his distance away from her personally.

It was this ruthlessness, besides the mandatory skill in warfare, that Jalal was trained in, and expected to live up to all his life. And he did oblige his mentors, Bairam Khan and Mahaam Anga,  in his early youth, whence the sobriquet of Jalal the Jallad.

But  somewhere inside him, there must always have been the  seeds of justice, of caring, or responsibility towards his awaam, above all towards the helpless and the weak, which surely did not come from the Timuri khoon  that Hamida mentions every now and then.Maybe it was Humayun's genes, or Hamida's, but mingled with a forcefulness, and a will to dominate that was  alien to both of them, plus the killer instinct that  is needed to make a great warrior. And without  the latter qualities, there would have been no Jalal and no Akbar.

Whatever its source, it is this fierce sense of justice and this protectiveness towards those who depend on him that make Jalal ride for 17 straight days to stop Adham Khan's carnage in Malwa, and nearly kill him in the process. And made Akbar ride I do not know how many straight days to stop the sati of the Maharani of Jodhpur (I do hope they show that in the serial!).
It would be wonderful if they show it. High time, they start concentrating on Akbar and his achievements and  limit Jodha to being his strong support, inspiration and emotional anchor. Now that they have started living happily ever after and that it would be ridiculous to show more misunderstandings,it is time to shift focus. As it is Akbar who is the centrepiece and even if the world vaguely remembers Jodha or Ruqaiya it is only because these women were his wives. Else they would have been forgotten names.

It was the same with the sarva dharma samabhava. Jalal always believed in it deep down, perhaps influenced by his early years spent among the Rajputs, not only in Umarkot, but later in Madhya Pradesh, and when the time came, it emerged, that is all.

The greatness of Jalaluddin Muhammad Akbar  was that he did not merely tolerate  the practice of religions other than his own. He accepted it and facilitated it.

You have underlined the contrast with 16th century Europe and England, of Protestants and Catholics killing each other  in the name of religion. But it was far worse that what your lines convey. It was systematic, institutionalized killings by the State, mostly by burning at the stake -  what was called an auto da fe in the home of the Spanish Inquisition -  and this after prolonged torture on the rack and/or the wheel, to "save the  soul" of the unfortunate. Often in public, as a general celebration of the victory of "the true faith"

Nor was this kind of bigoted horror confined to medieval Europe. In the greatest country on earth, as the USA is called, till the 1930s. there were public lynchings, in the deep South,  of black Americans  accused of petty crimes. They were strung up in  public and tortured to death, while large crowds of respectable citizens watched, as if at an entertainment,therir children, in their Sunday best, on their shoulders. Picture postcards of such events were banned by the US Post only in 1923. I saw a ghastly exhibition about all this in the New York Metropolitan Museum in the mid-1990s.
How barbaric! And the colloseum where people were served as lunch to hungry lions! Why even 400 years after the times of Akbar, we had Hitler and his concentration camps.
Think of all this, and then think of Akbar! If Jodha had had even a very limited notion of the kinds of things that went on in Europe in her times, she would have realized that Jalal the Jallad was an angel by comparison.

Of course Akbar went even further and tried to meld the best from Hinduism and Islam into the Din-e-Ilahi, but he was far ahead of not only his time, but even our present one.
Very true. He was far far ahead of his times. Even after another 500 years, it is a doubt if man can think like Akbar and take the best from all religions.

The other point I have made repeatedly, right from my 3rd or 4th post in the IF, is about Jalal's  very unusual sense of gratitude to anyone who did anything for him, from his Khan Baba and his Badiammi at one extreme to the forester who shares his food with him while he is searching for Jodha  at the other. Gratitude is rare among royalty, who have a highly pronounced sense of entitlement, and think that it is the privilege of their subjects to be able to serve them and make sacrifices for them. Jalal is the antithesis of this kind of royalty.
Jalal has used the fierceness that his blood gave him only to protect the values he held dear. For the greater good. He was made of every kind of goodness within. His warrior training under BK and MA gave him the spirit and ability to uphold his goodness. Kannadasan's lines suit Jalal perfectly...
Karunai Irunthaal Vallal Agalam
Kadamai Irunthaal Veeran Aagalam
Prumai Irunthaal Manithan Aagalam
Mndrum Irunthaal Thalaivan Aagalam

 
and Jalal was a perfect 'Thalaivan', an exemplary leader, the likes of whom the nation awaits today.
 
(The lines mean...
 
If you have compassion, you can become a great daanveer
If you have a sense of duty, you can become a brave person
If you have patience, you can become a good human being
If you have all three, you can become a great leader.)

A companion, and not so welcome  trait is his tendency to (a) blindly trust those he sees as very close to him and (b) forgive them even the worst of trespasses for family reasons. These are dangerous traits in a great ruler, and but for the fact that  he was throughout under the protection of Adiana's Ms.Kayanat - Jaako raakhe saiyaan, maar sake na koyi  - Jalal would have been disposed of very easily by any number of insider enemies.  That he survived as the Shahenshah-e-Hind for 49 years (1556-1605) was no thanks to Jalal himself!
But Ms.Kayanat has to be your protector even to walk down the stairs and cross the road. Goodness, that usually seems to us as weakness only adds Ms.Kayanat's invisible rings of safety around us.  It was his unbelievable ability to forgive and think good for all that probably made saiyaan raakofy him that the poori bairi jag baal na baanka kari sakey. And aunty, it takes only a little courage to slap or revenge your enemy. It needs much more courage to forgive them. Forgivance is the zenith of bravery and Akbar was one of the bravest men the world has seen.

I am not going into the kind of poodle he has become in love. I am by now past lamenting over  such a steep fall. But  I would any day have the swaggering, rakish buccaneer who entered the enemy's domain in Amer and came out safe, beating almost impossible odds -it was wonderful to see the old Jalal in chain mail! -  instead of the lovelorn husband who practically begs his Jodha Begum to spend the night with him, and laughs helplessly when she turns him down flat. His present avatar often  makes me feel downright queasy.  
Just thinking what our Jalal of episode 42(hamam khana) done in a similar situation!  Lashy...how about an OS here?

Once again, I loved your tour d'horizon of Jalal,  and your lavish tribute to Rajat for having made this Jalal his own,  so much so that one does not even think of Rajat the actor as one watches him onscreen, which is the ultimate tribute for any artist. But then need I say any of this?

Shyamala Aunty
PS: The  bolding is not by choice!


sandhya
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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by shobita on 2014-06-22, 19:53

Beautiful post Aunty! And wonderful post by Sandhya!
This paragraph was profound


Of course Akbar went even further and tried to meld the best from Hinduism and Islam into the Din-e-Ilahi, but he was far ahead of not only his time, but even our present one.


I'll share something I read sometime back about Akbar the Great which is an illustration of what you have stated - "He was far ahead of not only his time, but even our present one" -  
====================================
In 1582, King Philip II of Spain received a letter from the Mughal Emperor Akbar of India.
Akbar wrote: "As most men are fettered by bonds of tradition, and by imitating ways followed by their fathers... everyone continues, without investigating their arguments and reasons, to follow the religion in which he was born and educated, thus excluding himself from the possibility of ascertaining the truth, which is the noblest aim of the human intellect. Therefore we associate at convenient seasons with learned men of all religions, thus deriving profit from their exquisite discourses and exalted aspirations." [Johnson, 208]
kbar the Great chided Philip for the anti-Protestant excesses of the Spanish Counter-reformation. Spain's Catholic inquisitors had by this time mostly rid the country of Muslims and Jews, so turned their murderous attentions to Protestant Christians instead, particularly in Spanish-ruled Holland.
=====================================
I can't think of any leader in today's times who could broach a subject as sensitive as religion with such remarkable clarity. Truly he was far ahead of even our times.
Another paragraph which I particularly liked was :


Maybe it was Humayun's genes, or Hamida's, but mingled with a forcefulness, and a will to dominate that was  alien to both of them, plus the killer instinct that  is needed to make a great warrior. And without  the latter qualities, there would have been no Jalal and no Akbar.


He was a dichotomous  personality. Well he was not Ashoka the Great. And you brought out this dichotomy very beautifully. 
I feel irritated whenever I see Jalal becoming a love sick husband, but somehow this daily soap has kept me glued like none other. And I keep wondering why Jalal does not go to war? I always thought that war kept Akbar occupied for most of his youth. I wish the CVs show Akbar on the battlefield. And yes ,I wish they also show Jodha and Akbar unabashedly flirting with each other Wink

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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by Greeshma014 on 2014-06-22, 22:41

Sandhya, excellent post. hpee  hpee  hpee . ......
res    
Thank u Aunty.. long hug  ..Aunty-Sandhya combination made dis post , one of the best posts on our very own JALAL..now AKBAR THE GREAT...I wanted to write adetailed comment,but busy with my xams..sorry...long hug


Last edited by Greeshma014 on 2014-06-23, 21:45; edited 1 time in total

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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by sashashyam on 2014-06-23, 00:35

Thank you, my pet! I really love the first picture. My comments on your comments are in a separate post. Shyamala Auntysandhya wrote:Jo Hukum Mallika-e-Jalal.fan.club............

Journey from  to


Rajat is now the face of Akbar for us all




Last edited by sashashyam on 2014-06-23, 00:40; edited 1 time in total

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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by sashashyam on 2014-06-23, 00:37

Sandhya, my comments on your comments on my comments on your post!


Shyamala Aunty


Originally posted by Sandhya.A

[QUOTE=sashashyam]My dearest Sandhya,

What can one say when faced with such an obvious labour of love?
Love indeed it is aunty. Certain personalities from history and certain characters from mythology, epics and fiction are so loveable that they seem real and nearby .
It is a very comprehensive and affectionate round up of all that we have been shown of the journey from the early Jalal to the present Akbar- of course confined  to the serial script-  and as I feel about the same as you do all thru, there is nothing I need say except Bravo!
I cannot think of a single significant facet of his character development that you have missed out on, barring the much less impressive one of his personal relations.  And you have linked all the threads so smoothly and convincingly that the real Akbar himself would have been pleased!
One additional point, and this adds to Jalaluddin Muhammed Akbar's  greatness. He came of a race of fierce warriors who gave no quarter and expected none, and in whom the quality of mercy was notable by its absence.
Exactly, and this is what makes him exceptional. If he was a descendent of Manu Needhi Cholan and Pari Vallal and been compassionate and kind, you can understand. But with the blood of fierce warriors, if he has chosen to be just and kind, it speaks volumes of his greatness. Like Dumbledore said, it is the choices that matter- that makes a person. Though there were Slytherin traits in Harry he chose to be in Griffindor and the sorting hat put him right there.

Aha, here we go again with Harry Potter! Do you see, Sandhya, how remarkable a saga that is despite the pedestrian writing? We seem to find parallels in the Harry Potter universe for so many personalities and situations in ages and places far removed from the contemporary!

Which was,  truth to tell common in various degrees to all great conquerors down the ages - Alexander of Macedon routinely massacred the inhabitants of all the cities that he was forced to besiege and conquer, and during the Spanish War against Napoleon (to be precise against his brother Joseph, the hapless and incapable King of Spain), the Duke of Wellington  let his troops loose on all the conquered cities, as he was perennially short of cash and had nothing with which to reward them and make them ready and willing to fight  the battles that h knew lay ahead. What happened to the population of those cities can be imagined.
The gentle and ineffectual Humayun was probably the sole exception to this rule in the nasl-e-Timuri. The forefathers of whom the present imperial family, including the oh so gentle  Hamida Banu,  is so proud, Timurlang and Chengiz Khan, would have been totally contemptuous of his  weakness, just as Bairam Khan was. They would have been right too, for see what happened to Humayun (no wonder his eyes were ever trained on Jannat, not on the here and now!) and what would have happened to Jalal but for the ruthless Bairam Khan and Mahaam Anga!
I must admit, I expected a word of thanks to MA too, along with BK, in his 10th year celebrations of the Battle of Panipet as she too had a big role in making him a shahenshah. He could have acknowledged her services in public and yet kept his distance away from her personally.
No, Sandhya, for he says Aaj  humein jinki kami sabse zyada mehsoos hoti hai, ie one of the dear departed. Mahaam is alive and kicking, so she need not count. Moreover, unless the person who had fallen from grace had Jodha Begum's infallible recommendation, as Bakshi Banu and Sharifuddin had, I think Jalal never forgot and definitely never forgave an offence, above all an offence against, whom else, Jodha Begum!

It was this ruthlessness, besides the mandatory skill in warfare, that Jalal was trained in, and expected to live up to all his life. And he did oblige his mentors, Bairam Khan and Mahaam Anga,  in his early youth, whence the sobriquet of Jalal the Jallad.
But  somewhere inside him, there must always have been the  seeds of justice, of caring, or responsibility towards his awaam, above all towards the helpless and the weak, which surely did not come from the Timuri khoon  that Hamida mentions every now and then.Maybe it was Humayun's genes, or Hamida's, but mingled with a forcefulness, and a will to dominate that was  alien to both of them, plus the killer instinct that  is needed to make a great warrior. And without  the latter qualities, there would have been no Jalal and no Akbar.
Whatever its source, it is this fierce sense of justice and this protectiveness towards those who depend on him that make Jalal ride for 17 straight days to stop Adham Khan's carnage in Malwa, and nearly kill him in the process. And made Akbar ride I do not know how many straight days to stop the sati of the Maharani of Jodhpur (I do hope they show that in the serial!).
It would be wonderful if they show it. High time, they start concentrating on Akbar and his achievements and  limit Jodha to being his strong support, inspiration and emotional anchor. Now that they have started living happily ever after and that it would be ridiculous to show more misunderstandings,it is time to shift focus. As it is Akbar who is the centrepiece and even if the world vaguely remembers Jodha or Ruqaiya it is only because these women were his wives. Else they would have been forgotten names.
It was the same with the sarva dharma samabhava. Jalal always believed in it deep down, perhaps influenced by his early years spent among the Rajputs, not only in Umarkot, but later in Madhya Pradesh, and when the time came, it emerged, that is all.
The greatness of Jalaluddin Muhammad Akbar  was that he did not merely tolerate  the practice of religions other than his own. He accepted it and facilitated it.
You have underlined the contrast with 16th century Europe and England, of Protestants and Catholics killing each other  in the name of religion. But it was far worse that what your lines convey. It was systematic, institutionalized killings by the State, mostly by burning at the stake -  what was called an auto da fe in the home of the Spanish Inquisition -  and this after prolonged torture on the rack and/or the wheel, to "save the  soul" of the unfortunate. Often in public, as a general celebration of the victory of "the true faith"
Nor was this kind of bigoted horror confined to medieval Europe. In the greatest country on earth, as the USA is called, till the 1930s. there were public lynchings, in the deep South,  of black Americans  accused of petty crimes. They were strung up in  public and tortured to death, while large crowds of respectable citizens watched, as if at an entertainment,therir children, in their Sunday best, on their shoulders. Picture postcards of such events were banned by the US Post only in 1923. I saw a ghastly exhibition about all this in the New York Metropolitan Museum in the mid-1990s.
How barbaric! And the colloseum where people were served as lunch to hungry lions! Why even 400 years after the times of Akbar, we had Hitler and his concentration camps.
Think of all this, and then think of Akbar! If Jodha had had even a very limited notion of the kinds of things that went on in Europe in her times, she would have realized that Jalal the Jallad was an angel by comparison.
Of course Akbar went even further and tried to meld the best from Hinduism and Islam into the Din-e-Ilahi, but he was far ahead of not only his time, but even our present one.
Very true. He was far far ahead of his times. Even after another 500 years, it is a doubt if man can think like Akbar and take the best from all religions.
The other point I have made repeatedly, right from my 3rd or 4th post in the IF, is about Jalal's  very unusual sense of gratitude to anyone who did anything for him, from his Khan Baba and his Badiammi at one extreme to the forester who shares his food with him while he is searching for Jodha  at the other. Gratitude is rare among royalty, who have a highly pronounced sense of entitlement, and think that it is the privilege of their subjects to be able to serve them and make sacrifices for them. Jalal is the antithesis of this kind of royalty.

Jalal has used the fierceness that his blood gave him only to protect the values he held dear. For the greater good. He was made of every kind of goodness within. His warrior training under BK and MA gave him the spirit and ability to uphold his goodness. Kannadasan's lines suit Jalal perfectly...
Karunai Irunthaal Vallal Aagalam
Kadamai Irunthaal Veeran Aagalam
Porumai Irunthaal Manithan Aagalam
Moondrum Irunthaal Thalaivan Aagalam

 
and Jalal was a perfect 'Thalaivan', an exemplary leader, the likes of whom the nation awaits today.
 
(The lines mean...
 
If you have compassion, you can become a great daanveer
If you have a sense of duty, you can become a brave person
If you have patience, you can become a good human being
If you have all three, you can become a great leader.)

A very beautiful formulation, Sandhya, the part in bold, as is the verse for Kannadasan, which is an inspired choice.


A companion, and not so welcome  trait is his tendency to (a) blindly trust those he sees as very close to him and (b) forgive them even the worst of trespasses for family reasons. These are dangerous traits in a great ruler, and but for the fact that  he was throughout under the protection of Adiana's Ms.Kayanat - Jaako raakhe saiyaan, maar sake na koyi  - Jalal would have been disposed of very easily by any number of insider enemies.  That he survived as the Shahenshah-e-Hind for 49 years (1556-1605) was no thanks to Jalal himself!
But Ms.Kayanat has to be your protector even to walk down the stairs and cross the road. Goodness, that usually seems to us as weakness only adds Ms.Kayanat's invisible rings of safety around us.  It was his unbelievable ability to forgive and think good for all that probably made saiyaan raakofy him that the poori bairi jag baal na baanka kari sakey. And aunty, it takes only a little courage to slap or revenge your enemy. It needs much more courage to forgive them. Forgivance is the zenith of bravery and Akbar was one of the bravest men the world has seen.
Sounds very nice and noble, Sandhya, and it is all right if you take the fallout of forgiveness, when the one forgiven turns around and kicks you in the teeth (which happens more often than you would like to believe, for gratitude is a corrosive sentiment), on the personal level. Your life is your own to muck up as you like.

But it is NOT all right for a ruler to endanger the lives of hundreds and thousands of his subjects and dependents through the foolish quixotry of forgiving those who do not deserve it at all, and who can hit back at  him and his people later. This is exactly what Prithviraj Chauhan did with Muhammad Ghori, with the horrible consequences that need no repeating, That act of forgiveness was NOT bravery on the part of Prithviraj; it was inexcusable,  reckless misjudgement. If he did not want to execute Ghori, he could have imprisoned him for life. Then  not only  his own life, but those of tens of thousands of his hapless subjects who were slaughtered by Ghori the next year, would have been saved.

Here, one can cite any number of enemies that Jalal forgave for purely personal reasons: Bakshi Banu, Sharifuddin, Abul Mali. Most of them turned viciously against him again and again. This is pure folly. If even one had succeeded in his plots, what would have happened to his awaam?

As for your emphatic "Goodness, that usually seems to us as weakness only adds Ms.Kayanat's invisible rings of safety around us.  It was his unbelievable ability to forgive and think good for all that probably made saiyaan raakofy him that the poori bairi jag baal na baanka kari sakey",  what did all the millions of Jews who died in Hitler's camps  do to deserve their fate? Were they all so wicked that Ms,Kayanat did not look out for them? No rings of safety even for the gentle and good among them? Or for Nirbhaya and all the thousands of young women who suffer awful fates every year? Come on, my dear!


I am not going into the kind of poodle he has become in love. I am by now past lamenting over  such a steep fall. But  I would any day have the swaggering, rakish buccaneer who entered the enemy's domain in Amer and came out safe, beating almost impossible odds -it was wonderful to see the old Jalal in chain mail! -  instead of the lovelorn husband who practically begs his Jodha Begum to spend the night with him, and laughs helplessly when she turns him down flat. His present avatar often  makes me feel downright queasy.  
Just thinking what our Jalal of episode 42(hamam khana) done in a similar situation!  Lashy...how about an OS here?
Once again, I loved your tour d'horizon of Jalal,  and your lavish tribute to Rajat for having made this Jalal his own,  so much so that one does not even think of Rajat the actor as one watches him onscreen, which is the ultimate tribute for any artist. But then need I say any of this?
Shyamala Aunty
PS: The  bolding is not by choice!

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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by riyya6 on 2014-06-23, 06:03

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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by zuzana on 2014-06-23, 08:56

Wow Sandhya fabulous writing..loved it...you have brought out Akbar's character and what made him what he was superbly.  Clap 

Shyamalaji: Thanks for sharing with us this fabuous piece of writing of Sandhya...I loved your reply especially the forgiving part...its was not real and applicable in those times..it was a ruthless era and forgiving means inviting your own death which would mean a great loss to his people who he was ruling.

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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by sashashyam on 2014-06-23, 09:08



Thank you, my dear Zuzana, and where have you been for so long? I missed you on my threads, my dear!
As the forgiveness part, I am glad you see my point. No ruler has  the right to endanger the lives and the future of his subject to satisfy his personal predilections. Akbar was plain lucky, that was all.
His great contemporary, Elizabeth I of England, lived just as endangered a life as Akbar for almost  as long - 45 years as  queen as against 49 for Akbar. starting 2 years after him, in 1558, and dying 2 years earlier, in 1603 -  with a much worse childhood, but she succeeded not by being forgiving but by practising eternal vigilance and ceaseless caution.
Akbar was of course by far the greater human being, apart from ruling over a very much larger and richer empire than Elizabeth, but as for his tendency to pardon his enemies when they happened to be family, the less said the better.

Shyamala


zuzanaWow Sandhya fabulous writing..loved it...you have brought out Akbar's character and what made him what he was superbly.  Clap 

Shyamalaji: Thanks for sharing with us this fabuous piece of writing of Sandhya...I loved your reply especially the forgiving part...its was not real and applicable in those times..it was  a ruthless era and forgiving means inviting your own death which would mean a great loss to his people who he was ruling.

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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by sashashyam on 2014-06-23, 09:26

My dear Shobita,
Thank you, my dear, and I am glad you loved Sandhya's take on Jalal's personal journey as much as I did, and my own supplementary take on it as well.

I was delighted to see this letter from Akbar to King Philip II of Spain, of the existence of which I had no idea. Philip II, whose palace at El Escorial I have visited, was one of the most gloomy, bigoted,hidebound,  and bureaucratic rulers one could ever imagine. He was so slow to react to the smallest new idea – invariably referring it to a committee that did not report for at least 5 years - that change was nipped in the bud every single time.


But his empire - contrary to the self-glorifying impression conveyed by British historians and their accounts of the destruction of the Spanish Armada - was so huge and so rich from South American gold, that it survived even his rule.

I wonder what his response to Akbar's message was.

Apart from his breadth of vision and innate humanism that it reveals, what impressed me, as a professional diplomat, was Akbar's  interest in the world so far outside his own immediate neighbourhood, and his keeping abreast of the Counter-reformation in faraway Spain.
I wonder how he got to know about it. Maybe some of the beleaguered Spanish Muslims drifted to Agra and briefed him about their plight, thus impelling him to write this letter. It is a curious little puzzle. Did you learn anything about how Akbar came to write this letter to Philip, who was his envoy to the Spanish court, and whether there was a reply?

And yes, like all great men, Akbar was a dichotomous personality, not that you would get that from watching this serial. Now he is going to be busy for the next week exculpating Todar Mal, for Jodha seems to have dumped Todar Mal for Shehnaaz. Another example of misplaced trust. Sandhya, are you listening?

Shyamala Aunty


Shobita
Beautiful post Aunty! And wonderful post by Sandhya!

This paragraph was profound
Of course Akbar went even further and tried to meld the best from Hinduism and Islam into the Din-e-Ilahi, but he was far ahead of not only his time, but even our present one.

I'll share something I read sometime back about Akbar the Great which is an illustration of what you have stated - "He was far ahead of not only his time, but even our present one" -  
====================================
In 1582, King Philip II of Spain received a letter from the Mughal Emperor Akbar of India.
Akbar wrote: "As most men are fettered by bonds of tradition, and by imitating ways followed by their fathers... everyone continues, without investigating their arguments and reasons, to follow the religion in which he was born and educated, thus excluding himself from the possibility of ascertaining the truth, which is the noblest aim of the human intellect. Therefore we associate at convenient seasons with learned men of all religions, thus deriving profit from their exquisite discourses and exalted aspirations." [Johnson, 208]
kbar the Great chided Philip for the anti-Protestant excesses of the Spanish Counter-reformation. Spain's Catholic inquisitors had by this time mostly rid the country of Muslims and Jews, so turned their murderous attentions to Protestant Christians instead, particularly in Spanish-ruled Holland.
=====================================
I can't think of any leader in today's times who could broach a subject as sensitive as religion with such remarkable clarity. Truly he was far ahead of even our times.
Another paragraph which I particularly liked was :

Maybe it was Humayun's genes, or Hamida's, but mingled with a forcefulness, and a will to dominate that was  alien to both of them, plus the killer instinct that  is needed to make a great warrior. And without  the latter qualities, there would have been no Jalal and no Akbar.

He was a dichotomous  personality. Well he was not Ashoka the Great. And you brought out this dichotomy very beautifully. 

I feel irritated whenever I see Jalal becoming a love sick husband, but somehow this daily soap has kept me glued like none other. And I keep wondering why Jalal does not go to war? I always thought that war kept Akbar occupied for most of his youth. I wish the CVs show Akbar on the battlefield. And yes ,I wish they also show Jodha and Akbar unabashedly flirting with each other Wink


Last edited by sashashyam on 2014-06-23, 15:35; edited 1 time in total

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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by zuzana on 2014-06-23, 09:39

sashashyam wrote:


Thank you, my dear Zuzana, and where have you been for so long? I missed you on my threads, my dear!
As the forgiveness part, I am glad you see my point. No ruler has  the right to endanger the lives and the future of his subject to satisfy his personal predilections. Akbar was plain lucky, that was all.
His great contemporary, Elizabeth I of England, lived just as endangered a life as Akbar for almost  as long - 45 years as  queen as against 49 for Akbar. starting 2 years after him, in 1558, and dying 2 years earlier, in 1603 -  with a much worse childhood, but she succeeded not by being forgiving but by practising eternal vigilance and ceaseless caution.
Akbar was of course by far the greater human being, apart from ruling over a very much larger and richer empire than Elizabeth, but as for his tendency to pardon his enemies when they happened to be family, the less said the better.

Shyamala


zuzanaWow Sandhya fabulous writing..loved it...you have brought out Akbar's character and what made him what he was superbly.  Clap 

Shyamalaji: Thanks for sharing with us this fabuous piece of writing of Sandhya...I loved your reply especially the forgiving part...its was not real and applicable in those times..it was  a ruthless era and forgiving means inviting your own death which would mean a great loss to his people who he was ruling.

Shyamalaji sorry I have stopped watching the show long back...its so lacklustre...I have even stopped reading the WUs...

wow Shyamalaji you are a treasure of knowledge...its always a pleasure reading you as I would def come across something I didnt know..hearing abt Elizabeth I...I would say yes Jalal was def lucky as you said...its not easy to survivie inspite of being surrounded by close enemies within very close range.

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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by --sumana13-- on 2014-06-23, 10:41

It is such a great pleasure to read Shyamala and Sandhya ..
Loved everything about your posts my dear .. Thanks for sharing your views here .... Its an honour to have awesome members like you in Dhwani 
 
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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by harrybird on 2014-06-23, 10:44

What can I say about the way you two observe, analyse, connect dots, explore, unravel & ask interesting questions???

AKBAR - THE GREATEST


RAJAT - SHEER MAGIC


SS COMBO - INTELLECTUAL FEAST


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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by harrybird on 2014-06-23, 11:42

sandhya wrote:Just thinking what our Jalal of episode 42(hamam khana) done in a similar situation!  Lashy...how about an OS here?

................... hpee  hpee  hpee 

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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by sashashyam on 2014-06-23, 11:56

The pleasure is ours, Sumana, and I know I can speak for Sandhya on this, to be part of your wonderful, truly open forum. Thank you! Shyamala--sumana13-- wrote:It is such a great pleasure to read Shyamala and Sandhya ..
Loved everything about your posts my dear .. Thanks for sharing your views here .... Its an honour to have awesome members like you in Dhwani 
 
 hpee  Thumbsup  Heart

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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by sashashyam on 2014-06-23, 12:01

Anjali my dear,And what can I say about all the delightful clips and mannikins you dig up -  whether it is this wonderful quote from Akbar, who had the power of life and death over millions of religions other than his own and was yet so tolerant and accepting of such differences, wrote:and the CVs want to show this emperor as the  creation of one of his begums. Kya kahein?Or that chap in a bathtub in your mail to Sandhya?Thank you for both,  and also for liking our pieces so much.Shyamala AuntyharrybirdWhat can I say about the way you two observe, analyse, connect dots, explore, unravel & ask interesting questions???

AKBAR - THE GREATEST


RAJAT - SHEER MAGIC


SS COMBO - INTELLECTUAL FEAST


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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by shobita on 2014-06-23, 18:30

sashashyam wrote:
My dear Shobita,
Thank you, my dear, and I am glad you loved Sandhya's take on Jalal's personal journey as much as I did, and my own supplementary take on it as well.

I was delighted to see this letter from Akbar to King Philip II of Spain, of the existence of which I had no idea. Philip II, whose palace at El Escorial I have visited, was one of the most gloomy, bigoted,hidebound,  and bureaucratic rulers one could ever imagine. He was so slow to react to the smallest new idea – invariably referring it to a committee that did not report for at least 5 years - that change was nipped in the bud every single time.


But his empire - contrary to the self-glorifying impression conveyed by British historians and their accounts of the destruction of the Spanish Armada - was so huge and so rich from South American gold, that it survived even his rule.

I wonder what his response to Akbar's message was.

Apart from his breadth of vision and innate humanism that it reveals, what impressed me, as a professional diplomat, was Akbar's  interest in the world so far outside his own immediate neighbourhood, and his keeping abreast of the Counter-reformation in faraway Spain.
I wonder how he got to know about it. Maybe some of the beleaguered Spanish Muslims drifted to Agra and briefed him about their plight, thus impelling him to write this letter. It is a curious little puzzle. Did you learn anything about how Akbar came to write this letter to Philip, who was his envoy to the Spanish court, and whether there was a reply?

And yes, like all great men, Akbar was a dichotomous personality, not that you would get that from watching this serial. Now he is going to be busy for the next week exculpating Todar Mal, for Jodha seems to have dumped Todar Mal for Shehnaaz. Another example of misplaced trust. Sandhya, are you listening?

Shyamala Aunty


Shobita
Beautiful post Aunty! And wonderful post by Sandhya!

This paragraph was profound
Of course Akbar went even further and tried to meld the best from Hinduism and Islam into the Din-e-Ilahi, but he was far ahead of not only his time, but even our present one.

I'll share something I read sometime back about Akbar the Great which is an illustration of what you have stated - "He was far ahead of not only his time, but even our present one" -  
====================================
In 1582, King Philip II of Spain received a letter from the Mughal Emperor Akbar of India.
Akbar wrote: "As most men are fettered by bonds of tradition, and by imitating ways followed by their fathers... everyone continues, without investigating their arguments and reasons, to follow the religion in which he was born and educated, thus excluding himself from the possibility of ascertaining the truth, which is the noblest aim of the human intellect. Therefore we associate at convenient seasons with learned men of all religions, thus deriving profit from their exquisite discourses and exalted aspirations." [Johnson, 208]
kbar the Great chided Philip for the anti-Protestant excesses of the Spanish Counter-reformation. Spain's Catholic inquisitors had by this time mostly rid the country of Muslims and Jews, so turned their murderous attentions to Protestant Christians instead, particularly in Spanish-ruled Holland.
=====================================
I can't think of any leader in today's times who could broach a subject as sensitive as religion with such remarkable clarity. Truly he was far ahead of even our times.
Another paragraph which I particularly liked was :

Maybe it was Humayun's genes, or Hamida's, but mingled with a forcefulness, and a will to dominate that was  alien to both of them, plus the killer instinct that  is needed to make a great warrior. And without  the latter qualities, there would have been no Jalal and no Akbar.

He was a dichotomous  personality. Well he was not Ashoka the Great. And you brought out this dichotomy very beautifully. 

I feel irritated whenever I see Jalal becoming a love sick husband, but somehow this daily soap has kept me glued like none other. And I keep wondering why Jalal does not go to war? I always thought that war kept Akbar occupied for most of his youth. I wish the CVs show Akbar on the battlefield. And yes ,I wish they also show Jodha and Akbar unabashedly flirting with each other Wink
I read this up at this link
http://asianhistory.about.com/od/india/p/akbarthegreatbio.htm

This article does not mention anything about the Spanish monarch's reply. I guess the author of this article picked it up from one of the books "The Mughal Empire". However, there is a fleeting mention of Akbar receiving envoys from many European nations.

Somehow the essence of the letter mentioned in the article stayed with me.

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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by lashy on 2014-06-24, 04:04

sashashyam wrote:


It was this ruthlessness, besides the mandatory skill in warfare, that Jalal was trained in, and expected to live up to all his life. And he did oblige his mentors, Bairam Khan and Mahaam Anga,  in his early youth, whence the sobriquet of Jalal the Jallad.


But  somewhere inside him, there must always have been the  seeds of justice, of caring, or responsibility towards his awaam, above all towards the helpless and the weak, which surely did not come from the Timuri khoon  that Hamida mentions every now and then.Maybe it was Humayun's genes, or Hamida's, but mingled with a forcefulness, and a will to dominate that was  alien to both of them, plus the killer instinct that  is needed to make a great warrior. And without  the latter qualities, there would have been no Jalal and no Akbar.


Whatever its source, it is this fierce sense of justice and this protectiveness towards those who depend on him that make Jalal ride for 17 straight days to stop Adham Khan's carnage in Malwa, and nearly kill him in the process. And made Akbar ride I do not know how many straight days to stop the sati of the Maharani of Jodhpur (I do hope they show that in the serial!).


It was the same with the sarva dharma samabhava. Jalal always believed in it deep down, perhaps influenced by his early years spent among the Rajputs, not only in Umarkot, but later in Madhya Pradesh, and when the time came, it emerged, that is all.

The greatness of Jalaluddin Muhammad Akbar  was that he did not merely tolerate  the practice of religions other than his own. He accepted it and facilitated it.

You made me a bit teary eyed by writing this up aunty No ... obviously, reading up the contrasts on European/American cruelties made my stomach turn since I'm averse to any form of torture... (can't even hear about it...)
Truly the serial is not doing this great man justice.. 
Loved reading it - it was so heartfelt! 


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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by lashy on 2014-06-24, 04:08

Sandhya superb...  long hug 
OS... in bathtub?  hppy  
Deffo a detour from the emotionally heart-tugging thread that this one..

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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by sandhya on 2014-06-24, 09:09

lashy wrote:Sandhya superb...  long hug 
OS... in bathtub?  hppy  
Deffo a detour from the emotionally heart-tugging thread that this one..
Nahi re! OS on How the Jalal of hamaam khana epi 42 (our long lost rake No ) would have reacted to Jodha refusing to stay the night in the pretext of mb preperation.

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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by lashy on 2014-06-24, 11:33

sandhya wrote:
lashy wrote:Sandhya superb...  long hug 
OS... in bathtub?  hppy  
Deffo a detour from the emotionally heart-tugging thread that this one..
Nahi re! OS on How the Jalal of hamaam khana epi 42 (our long lost rake No ) would have reacted to Jodha refusing to stay the night in the pretext of mb preperation.
 No True that!

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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by sashashyam on 2014-06-24, 11:51

Thank you, Lashykanna. I am glad you liked  the S&S homage to Jalaluddin Muhammed Akbar as much as I did. wrote:
This  is all that is left for us discerning viewers these days, as Jalal sinks ever deeper into a morass of directionless governance, an aimless existence spent organising Meena Bazaars, and helpless  enslavement to his Jodha Begum.

Yes, I cannot stand torture scenes on screen either, or in books, so I even avoided the James Bond series. But all those horrors that I had written about did happen, and were applauded by normal, law abiding, supposedly decent citizens who would,  in their daily life, never have so much as kicked a dog. That was the real horror of it all, just like the overt and covert support from most Germans for the Nazi concentration camps.
Shyamala Aunty

lashy
sashashyam wrote:It was this ruthlessness, besides the mandatory skill in warfare, that Jalal was trained in, and expected to live up to all his life. And he did oblige his mentors, Bairam Khan and Mahaam Anga,  in his early youth, whence the sobriquet of Jalal the Jallad.

But  somewhere inside him, there must always have been the  seeds of justice, of caring, or responsibility towards his awaam, above all towards the helpless and the weak, which surely did not come from the Timuri khoon  that Hamida mentions every now and then.Maybe it was Humayun's genes, or Hamida's, but mingled with a forcefulness, and a will to dominate that was  alien to both of them, plus the killer instinct that  is needed to make a great warrior. And without  the latter qualities, there would have been no Jalal and no Akbar.


Whatever its source, it is this fierce sense of justice and this protectiveness towards those who depend on him that make Jalal ride for 17 straight days to stop Adham Khan's carnage in Malwa, and nearly kill him in the process. And made Akbar ride I do not know how many straight days to stop the sati of the Maharani of Jodhpur (I do hope they show that in the serial!).


It was the same with the sarva dharma samabhava. Jalal always believed in it deep down, perhaps influenced by his early years spent among the Rajputs, not only in Umarkot, but later in Madhya Pradesh, and when the time came, it emerged, that is all.

The greatness of Jalaluddin Muhammad Akbar  was that he did not merely tolerate  the practice of religions other than his own. He accepted it and facilitated it.

You made me a bit teary eyed by writing this up aunty No ... obviously, reading up the contrasts on European/American cruelties made my stomach turn since I'm averse to any form of torture... (can't even hear about it...)
Truly the serial is not doing this great man justice.. 
Loved reading it - it was so heartfelt! 

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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by lashy on 2014-06-24, 21:38

Yes aunty.. having said that I have seen documentaries on the concentration camp etc.. but my worst experience till date has to be the live screening of what happened to the Tamilians in SL.. 
Its something that has scarred my mind forever!

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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

Post by sashashyam on 2014-06-25, 11:41

I have not seen that, my dear, but I can well imagine what it was like. It is things like this, decade after decade, century after century, millennium after millennium, that make me at times doubt the existence of a just Almighty. Either all of existence is a crazy lottery, or the Almighty is like the standard issue night shift security guard, asleep at the switch most of the time. Either way, the whole thing is a cruel joke. Shyamala Auntylashy wrote:Yes aunty.. having said that I have seen documentaries on the concentration camp etc.. but my worst experience till date has to be the live screening of what happened to the Tamilians in SL.. 
Its something that has scarred my mind forever!

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Re: From Jallad to Akbar: In praise of Sandhya

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